FaceBook vs Google traffic (again!)

A continual theme in my unsolicited advice is trying to figure out how best to get eyeballs on your content, and how Google and Facebook contribute traffic. It’s an ongoing back and forth between two giants.

There are a few new bits of data to add to the ongoing discussion. Recode has 2017 traffic data, and it looks like Facebook’s new  policies of prioritizing families and friends in their feed led to a drop in referral traffic for news (and a corresponding increase by Google referrals). graph of referrals from Facebook and Google in 2017

An interesting, though not direct, confirmation of those changes in Facebook algorithm can be seen in this article from Neiman Labs; over 70% of articles in feeds are now from friends and families. News content: less than 10%.

There also has been an increase in traffic coming through the Google AMP service, or Accelerated Mobile Pages.  AMP is a competitor for Facebook Instant Articles, and they both try to do the same thing: serve up content from all over the web as fast as possible. With the caveat, of course, that you remain within the Facebook or Google Ecosystem when you consume those articles.

There is also an interesting new feature in Google’s Chrome browser. When you open Chrome, it will suggest news items for you (if you are an android user). This obviously leads to increased traffic for suggested web pages, but it’s too early to say much about how those pages are chosen or how much traffic it generates.

The ultimate take-home message for content creators is still the same: don’t ignore Facebook or Google. You have to optimize for both.

Facebook Page Traffic: Still a Problem

I wrote earlier here about how traffic on non-profit Facebook pages is radically reduced because of algorithm changes. Some new data has been added from the Chicago Tribune:

Facebook’s algorithm isn’t surfacing one-third of our posts. And it’s getting worse

To give you a sense of scale, the Trib has over 500,000 followers on Facebook, much larger than most non-profits or small businesses. And yet, here’s some of the traffic stats they shared:

If you want a really thorough and wonky discussion of what this means, what Facebook recommends, and what to do next, check out this article. It’s not encouraging for those of us who manage pages with a much smaller audience.

 

Why I give away the secret sauce

Shape 161“Why are you telling everyone how to do your job!? Won’t that mean they won’t hire you?

That’s possible. But the folks that I know and work with are, for the most part, scientists, nature centers, and people working to broaden inclusion in STEM. So, I want them to succeed. I want them to succeed even if they don’t give me money.

The purpose of my Unsolicited Advice Column is to help you assess if you need someone external to help with your website re-design, or if you can do it yourself. And it also makes the process of what I do more transparent, so you know what to expect if you hire me.

What’s a Content Analysis?

Shape 12Getting ready to launch a new website is a great time to sit down and think about how your content is organized.  I can do this for you, or you can do it yourself! Here’s how.

Start with a content inventory—what’s there, and where is it?  Using a site map, or site map generating tools, will give you a detailed spreadsheet showing all your web pages, file names, and links.

Once you have your content inventoried, it’s time to step back and think about content analysis.  In other words, how is your content organized? It’s not just the words, it’s how your ideas and themes are organized, that makes a website compelling and useful.

Here’s some items you’ll want to think about as you look at your existing website:

  1. Currency—What information is out of date and needs to be removed, or marked as archival?
  2. Co-location and Consistency–Are items with similar content or items about the same topic grouped together? Whenever possible, content structures in similar content areas should be consistent.
  3. Differentiation–Are dissimilar items or items about different subject areas in different content areas?
  4. Completeness–All content mentioned or linked to should exist. (No broken links or “under construction” labels.)
  5. Information scent–Are labels appropriately descriptive of content? Will visitors to your site know they are on the proper path to finding the information they are looking for? Each page needs a meaningful title that can stand-alone and tell the reader about the page.
  6. Multiple access paths–Because users think about content in different ways, they should be able to take multiple paths to get to specific content. Users should be able to access the content they want through the browsing hierarchy, by using search, and sometimes via links in the content.
  7. Audience-relevance–Do you need to organize some content to allow different audience segments to easily find what’s relevant to them?

That’s a lot of prep work, but there’s a reason for it. Once you know what exists, you can use that analysis to develop a content strategy. This will define:

  • Key themes and messages (big ideas and themes)
  • Content purpose (why is your content on the web?)
  • Content gap analysis (what content is missing?)
  • Metadata and Keywords for search engine optimization

By making sure that all your content reflects your key theme, and determining what keywords should go on each of your pages, you can make your pages cleaner, more useful to users, and drive more traffic to the site.

This info modified in part from: